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BULLYING
 

Bullying is Never OK: Powerful Viral Video

8 Year Old Hangs Himself After Torment From Classmates

NEA Today Article: Bullying! Does It Get Better?
Info: Tragic Events

Special Memorial: Remembering the Victims of Bullying

Common Myths About Bullying

12 Year Old on Cheerleading Squad Commits Suicide Over Bullying

Info: Encouragement for LGBTQ Youth in Crisis

The Bully Project

 

Message of Encouragement

 

''We’ve got to dispel the myth that bullying is just a normal rite of passage – that it’s some inevitable part of growing up. It’s not. We have an obligation to ensure that our schools are safe for all of our kids. And to every young person out there you need to know that if you’re in trouble, there are caring adults who can help.

''I don’t know what it’s like to be picked on for being gay. But I do know what it’s like to grow up feeling that sometimes you don’t belong. It’s tough. And for a lot of kids, the sense of being alone or apart – I know can just wear on you. And when you’re teased or bullied, it can seem like somehow you brought it on yourself – for being different, or for not fitting in with everybody else.

But what I want to say is this. You are not alone. You didn’t do anything wrong. You didn’t do anything to deserve being bullied. And there is a whole world waiting for you, filled with possibilities.''

[Source: President Barack Obama]
 



The Trevor Project

It Gets Better Project

It Gets Better YouTube Channel

Dan & Terry: It Gets Better

President Barack Obama: It Gets Better
Info: LGBTQ Youth and Teens

Broadway Sings for the Trevor Project: It Gets Better

 

Impact of Bullying

 

Consider these important facts and statistics and the unhealthy impact of bullying on LGBTQ youth:

--8 out of 10 students have been verbally harassed at school
--4 out of 10 students have been physically harassed at school
--71% of students hear homophobic remarks (dyke, faggot) often or frequently
--80% of transgender students reported feeling unsafe at school because of their gender expression
--40% of homeless youth are LGBTQ
--The number one cause of LGBTQ youth homelessness is family rejection
--Sexual minority youth are at increased risk of suicide attempts

Adam Lambert: It Gets Better
Suze Orman: It Gets Better
Broadway Kids Against Bullying: I Have a Voice

Neil Patrick Harris: It Gets Better
Rob Thomas : It Gets Better

Broadway for Orlando: Love Sweet Love

 



Bullying Facts and Statistics


According to statistics, 23 per cent of elementary students reported being bullied one to three times per month. Recent bullying statistics admit that half of all bullying incidents go unreported. 100,000 students carry a gun to school bullying statistics say.

In a recent study, 77% of the students said they had been bullied. And 14% of those who were bullied said they experienced severe (bad) reactions to the abuse.

According to the Gallup News Service, Thirty-two percent of parents fear for their child’s physical safety when the child is at school. Thirty-nine percent of parents with a child in grade six or higher are more likely to say they fear for their child’s safety. Twenty-two percent of parents whose children are in grade five or lower fear for their child’s safety.

 



A poll of teens ages 12-17 proved that they think violence increased at their schools. 282,000 students are physically attacked in secondary schools each month. Those in the lower grades reported being in twice as many fights as those in the higher grades. However, there is a lower rate of serious violent crimes in the elementary level than in the middle or high schools.

According to the bullying statistics, thirty-two percent of parents fear for their child’s physical safety when the child is at school. Thirty-nine percent of parents with a child in grade six or higher are more likely to say they fear for their child’s safety. Twenty-two percent of parents whose children are in grade five or lower fear for their child’s safety.

90% of 4th through 8th graders report being victims of bullying. 39% of middle schoolers and 36% of high schoolers say they don’t feel safe at schools.

Among students, homicide perpetrators were more than twice as likely as homicide victims to have been bullied by peers. Bullying statistics say revenge is the strongest motivation for school shootings. 87% of students said shootings are motivated by a desire to “get back at those who have hurt them.” 86% of students said, “other kids picking on them, making fun of them or bullying them” causes teenagers to turn to lethal violence in the schools.

 



Bullying statistics shows that those who bully and are bullied appear to be at greatest risk of experiencing the following: loneliness; trouble making friends; lack of success in school; and involvement in problem behaviors such as smoking and drinking.

61% said students shoot others because they have been victims of physical abuse at home. 54% said witnessing physical abuse at home can lead to violence in school.

According to bullying statistics , one out of every 10 students who drops out of school does so because of repeated bullying. Harassment and bullying have been linked to 75 percent of school-shooting incidents.
 

Gloria Estefan: It Gets Better

Broadway Kids Against Bullying: I Have a Voice

Eve: It Gets Better

BD Wong: It Gets Better
Broadway for Orlando: Love Sweet Love

Chris Colfer: It Gets Better

 

Bullying and LGBTQ Youth

In March 2009, parents sued a Mentor, Ohio high school for not protecting their child from physical abuse, name-calling and taunts over his perceived sexual orientation. The student, Eric Mohat, was told by one of the school bullies, "Why don't you go home and shoot yourself, no one will miss you." Mohat did.

In April, 2009, an 11-year-old Massachusetts student committed suicide because of what his mom described as rampant bullying over his perceived sexual orientation at school.

Surveys of middle and high school students show that a great deal of verbal and physical bullying in our schools is directed at students who are, or are perceived to be lesbian, gay or sexual minority youth.

 

 

The National School Climate Survey, conducted in 2005 by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), concluded that three-quarters of the high school students surveyed heard derogatory and homophobic remarks “frequently” or “often” at school, and 90 percent heard the term “gay” used generally to imply someone is stupid or something is worthless. Bullying around issues of sexual orientation, non-conforming gender behaviors and dress was the most common form of bullying, second only to issues of appearance (body size and disability).

In a poll conducted in 2005 by Harris Interactive and GLSEN, 60 percent of students (aged 13-18) had been verbally or physically harassed or assaulted during the past school year because of real or “perceived race/ethnicity, disability, gender, sexual orientation, gender expression, or religion." Over half of these incidences were thought to be based on sexual orientation alone.

Among students who identified themselves as LGBTQ, 90 percent had been bullied in the past year. Of these, 66 percent had been verbally abused, 16 percent physically harassed, and 8 percent had been assaulted.

 



LGBTQ students reported feeling unsafe at school three times more often than non-LGBTQ students.

In a national survey of teens (ages 12-17) commissioned by the National Mental Health Association (NMHA), 78 percent of teens reported that kids who are gay or who are thought to be gay are teased or bullied in their schools and communities; 93 percent hear other youth use derogatory words about sexual orientation at least once in a while, and 51 percent hear these words every day.

The 2007 Indicators of School Crime and Safety Report conducted jointly by the US Departments of Education and Justice, found that 11 percent of students (aged 12-18) reported hearing hate-related words, 38 percent saw hate-related graffiti, and 1 percent reported that the hate-related words related to a disability or sexual orientation.
 

Bullied to Death: 8 Year Old Hangs Himself After Torment From Classmates

Bullying is Never OK: Powerful Viral Video

Info: Tragic Events

NEA Today Article: Bullying! Does It Get Better?
Common Myths About Bullying

Info: Encouragement for LGBTQ Youth in Crisis

Special Memorial: Remembering the Victims of Bullying

 

Gabriel Taye: Bullied to Death

 

In August 2017, 8-year-old Gabriel Taye hanged himself after constant torment by his classmates. The third-grade elementary student was tormented and bullied by classmates constantly and died by suicide two days after being shoved into a bathroom wall so hard he was knocked unconscious.

His parents say school officials in Cincinnati didn’t notify them of the nonstop bullying. Instead, the school covered up the violent incident that was caught on camera. It wasn’t until a police detective mentioned the footage of the assault outside of the bathroom door that his parents found out it had happened.

“If CPS had been honest with Taye's mother about what happened in the bathroom, how long he had been unconscious, and the dangerous school environment Gabe had to navigate each day of third grade, she would never had let him return to Carson,” their attorney said in a statement.

In the footage, Taye is shown reaching out to shake hands with another student who pulls Taye into the bathroom wall. After Taye falls to the floor, the bully disappears as other students poke, kick and walk past his body. After six minutes, an administrator arrives with other adults and Taye is shown walking away with them.

“I am my son’s voice, and it will be heard,” Taye’s mother, Cornelia Reynolds, said in a statement. “It is my obligation to make sure that this will never happen again. No, this will not go away. People need to know the truth and help fix this epidemic in our society by spreading awareness and speaking up.”

The school says that Taye told school officials that he had fainted and not that he had been bullied, but they didn’t tell his parents anything about the incident.

 

The Trevor Project

It Gets Better Project

It Gets Better YouTube Channel

Dan & Terry: It Gets Better

President Barack Obama: It Gets Better
Broadway Sings for the Trevor Project: It Gets Better

 

 

 

Asher Brown Kills Self After Years of Taunts

David and Amy Truong were looking for justice after their 13-year old son, Asher Brown, committed suicide in September 2010 after being relentlessly bullied at his Houston-area school. In addition to taking on his religion and fashion sense, Brown's peers took to - you guessed it - calling him "gay." Things became so bad that Asher shot himself to death.

The Truongs say they called the school to tell officials about the bullying. The school, for its part, insists no such calls every happened, but the distraught parents aren't giving up. "I did not hallucinate phone calls to counselors and assistant principals. We have no reason to make this up. It's like they're calling us liars," said Mrs. Truong, while her husband insisted, "We want justice. The people here need to be held responsible and to be stopped. It did happen. There are witnesses everywhere."

Now, Asher's parents hope to use his death as a lesson: "Our son is just the extreme case of what happens when (someone is) just relentless," insisted Mrs. Truong, before turning her attention to the bullies, "I hope you're happy with what you've done. I hope you got what you wanted and you're just real satisfied with yourself." And I hope the accused are apprehended and, yes, brought to justice: the tide of bullying needs to stop, period, and perpetrators need to know that their words can indeed break bones, and lives.

 

8 Year Old Hangs Himself After Torment From Classmates

12 Year Old on Cheerleading Squad Commits Suicide Over Bullying

Info: Tragic Events

SPLC's New Film to Combat Anti-Gay Bullying
Order Your Free Copy of the SPLC Film "Bullied"

Info: LGBTQ Youth and Teens

Special Memorial: Remembering the Victims of Bullying

Trailer for Film: Bully
Time Mag: A Punishing Movie Your Kids Must See
Info: Encouragement for LGBTQ Youth in Crisis

The Bully Project


 

Remembering Carl Walker-Hoover

On April 6, 2009, an 11-year old Massachusetts boy, Carl Walker-Hoover, took his life after enduring constant bullying, including anti-LGBTQ bullying. Though Carl did not identify as gay, his story is a tragic reminder that anti-LGBTQ bullying and harassment affects all students.

Carl Joseph Walker-Hoover, a junior at New Leadership Charter School in Springfield, hanged himself after enduring bullying at school, including daily taunts of being gay, despite his mother's weekly pleas to the school to address the problem.
 

Gloria Estefan: It Gets Better

Broadway Kids Against Bullying: I Have a Voice

Eve: It Gets Better

BD Wong: It Gets Better
Broadway for Orlando: Love Sweet Love

Chris Colfer: It Gets Better

 

Justin Aaberg: Bullied by Classmates for Being Gay

 

When Tammy Aaberg wears her purple T-shirt that says "End the Hate" every year on October 20, to commemorate Spirit Day (Anti-Bullying Day), she is thinking of her son Justin. In 2010, he killed himself after he was bullied at school for being gay. "We are losing too many kids. This has been kept silent for too long," says Aaberg, of Fridley, Minn., a Twin Cities suburb. She joins hundreds of thousands of young people across the US every year who wear purple on October 20 to call attention to the deaths of youths who committed suicide after they were bullied or harassed because they were gay or were thought to be gay.

 

Her son, Justin Aaberg, was 15 when he hanged himself in his room on July 9, 2010. His last Facebook post said, "If you really knew me, no one would like me," his mother says. Her son never told her of the emotional pain he was in, but gay people hear so many epithets and cruel remarks that they start to believe them, Aaberg says.

 

[Source: Marisol Bello, USA Today]

 

 

CBS News: Tyler Clementi Suicide
NPR News: Student's Suicide is Deadly Reminder of Intolerance
NY Times: Private Moment Made Public, Then a Fatal Jump
Huffington Post: Rutgers Student Commits Suicide

 

Tragic Suicide Death of Gay Rutgers Student

Tyler Clementi committed suicide Sept. 22, 2010 apparently after discovering that his Rutgers University roommate, Dharun Ravi, and friend Molly Wei, live-streamed Clementi in a sexual encounter with another male student without his knowledge, a lawyer for the Clementi family announced. Clementi's family attorney, Paul Mainardi, said that after learning of the violation of his privacy Clementi jumped off the George Washington Bridge, which connects New Jersey with upper Manhattan. Clementi's car, cell phone and computer were found near the bridge and his wallet was found on a walkway on the bridge. There was reportedly no note at the scene, but ABC News reported that Clementi left a final goodbye on his Facebook page that read "jumping off the gw bridge, sorry."

Investigators have not confirmed the suicide because no body has been found, but sources within the investigation told the Star-Ledger that witnesses say they saw him jump. Ravi and Wei were charged with illegally taping Clementi having sex and posting the images on the Internet, after they turned themselves in to the campus police. According to investigators, the first incident happened Sept. 19 when Ravi set up a web cam in the room to capture Clementi and his partner after Clementi asked to have the room alone for a few hours. "Roommate asked for the room till midnight. I went into molly's room and turned on my webcam. I saw him making out with a dude. Yay," Ravi said on his Twitter page in a Sept. 19 entry posted at 6:17 p.m., according to the New Jersey Star-Ledger. Ravi allegedly broadcast that encounter but investigators would not say what video site it was posted to. A few days later Ravi allegedly tweeted to his 150 followers telling them to "chat" him on iChat, an instant messaging sight with live video feed, the Star-Ledger reported. "Anyone with iChat, I dare you to video chat me between the hours of 9:30 and 12. Yes it's happening again," Ravi wrote Sept. 21. The next day Clementi's belongings were found on the bridge.

Steven Goldstein, chairman of the gay rights group Garden State Equality, said in a statement Wednesday that his group considers Clementi's death a hate crime. "We are sickened that anyone in our society, such as the students allegedly responsible for making the surreptitious video, might consider destroying others' lives as a sport," Goldstein said. The accused were classmates at West Windsor-Plainsboro High School North in Plainsboro, NJ. If convicted of the third degree offense of transmitting or distributing the images they could face up to five years in prison each under state law. A fourth degree conviction for collecting the images could mean up to 18 months in jail, according to the Middlesex County Prosecutor's Office. County Prosecutor Bruce Kaplan had no immediate comment about additional charges in the wake of Clementi's death.

 

Adam Lambert: It Gets Better
Suze Orman: It Gets Better
Broadway for Orlando: Love Sweet Love

Neil Patrick Harris: It Gets Better
Rob Thomas : It Gets Better

Broadway Kids Against Bullying: I Have a Voice

 

 

Girl Beaten Up for Having a Boy's Name

What's in a name? In November 2010, a 12 year old girl at Hernando Middle School in Mississippi was beaten by five fellow students -- reportedly because they said her name, Randi, was "a boy name." "They started talking about me like I was a man," she said. "That I shouldn't be in this world. And my name was a boy name." The four girls and a boy surrounded her after a Fellowship of Christian Students meeting, and, she said, kicked her in the rib and leg, hit her in the face, sat on her, pushed her face into the floor, and threw her onto a cafeteria table.

The incident was caught on surveillance camera. A school administrator issued a statement that "fighting is not tolerated and that disciplinary action will be taken to the fullest extent of the law." No charges were filed, however, because the police were not called. Whether the attack was an isolated incident or part of ongoing bullying remains unknown. The student in question was not said to be LGBTQ -- but whether she is or not doesn't matter. She was beaten because she was perceived to be in some way not conforming to her gender. That is yet another reason schools need to include discussions of sexual orientation and gender identity and expression in diversity and anti-bullying programs. It is not just LGBTQ students at risk, but potentially others as well. Students, teachers, and staff must learn that even characteristics some people might view as "deviant" or "sinful" are still no excuse for violence and bullying.
 

 

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